"

But I agree with you. It bothers me that I’m always told that I do strong female characters. When in reality, I look at my characters and I feel like they were all broken. They all came from a very devastating past. They were trying to achieve something, they had hope, and they wanted to get someplace, like everything other character that has a meaningful and relevant arc in the story.

It’s because we don’t really know women. We don’t write women accurately. We don’t see women the way that we should see women as a society, as a human race. When you see a real woman, you shouldn’t be saying she’s strong, you should be saying she’s real.

I’m not saying that Gamora is an exception, but you look at my character in Columbiana, and she’s stealthy, she’s agile, she’s physical. But even if I wasn’t physically agile, she would still carry the baggage of whatever happened in my childhood. And I handle myself in the way that I feel a woman should be. I don’t create it. It’s just something that comes natural.

So when people think they are paying me a compliment, in reality what we are saying as a society and as an art society, is that we need to focus more on the real aspect of what a woman is, and not the superficial cosmetic features of a woman as a muse to inspire us to create calendar girls. To create bombshells. To create serviceable characters, beautiful paintings of the girl with a pearl earring: if there’s nothing there behind it, it’s just her face - what’s the story?

"

— Zoe Saldana, speaking to Den of Geek. These musings in particular are so wonderfully expressed. (via pixiegrace)

(via hellotailor)

vayena:

wretchedoftheearth:

wretchedoftheearth:

I am still laughing at the /r/relationships post about the guy who initially wanted an open relationship so he could fuck other women since his girlfriend isn’t hot because she’s “bigger”, but she had much more luck and was even…

thranduilings:

frxdo:

idc if it’s true or not this headline is all that matters to me. x

(via bucky-barness)

"Why this fascination with the woman who doesn’t know she’s beautiful, the idealization of low self-esteem? It orients the singer as a savior — the sensitive soul whom this girl, who has been slaving away day in and day out in front of a mirror that just won’t reveal the beauty she longs to see, desperately requires. These aren’t songs for young men, who, theoretically, could listen and reconsider their standards of female beauty. These are songs for girls who get the message that insecurity has romantic value, if only because it’s the necessary setup to the grand moment in which they find the boys who — god bless them! — finally pull them out of it.

By all means, write songs about how beautiful women are. Write songs about how beautiful men are too! (Incidentally, if you’re unsure how specifically gendered this trope is: Try to imagine a song in which a female singer says just how much she wants to make a guy “feel beautiful.”) But don’t assume we’re uncomfortable in our skin just because we dress it up when we present it to the world. Don’t tell us we don’t know we’re beautiful, and certainly don’t tell us that our ignorance to this fact is our best quality. We’re good."

Let’s Stop Singing Songs About Women Who Don’t Know They’re Beautiful (via brutereason)

(via brutereason)

why must you do this

(Source: theletteraesc)


by victongai:
Spellbound
Victo Ngai
For a article in Dension magazine about Fairy Tales and the changing nature of how these stories are told — from Grimm’s tales, to the super-scrubbed happy Disney tales through to the darker popularity of shows like Breaking Bad now. Fairy tale expert Maria Tatar also discusses how some of the world’s oldest tales help us navigate modern life.
Big thanks to Erin from Em Dash for this very interesting project!

by victongai:

Spellbound

Victo Ngai

For a article in Dension magazine about Fairy Tales and the changing nature of how these stories are told — from Grimm’s tales, to the super-scrubbed happy Disney tales through to the darker popularity of shows like Breaking Bad now. Fairy tale expert Maria Tatar also discusses how some of the world’s oldest tales help us navigate modern life.

Big thanks to Erin from Em Dash for this very interesting project!

(via bookporn)

shipsanddip:

I find it so fucking hilarious, men think about famous women and female characters sexually all the time, they masturbate to the thought of Scarlett Johansson and Black Widow all the time, there is an entire genre of porn dedicated to spoofing movies like Star Wars and Harry…

jabletown:

hellocharlesxavierhere:


Charles’ Oxford Apartment


omg you rich bastard that’s so awesome

jabletown:

hellocharlesxavierhere:

Charles’ Oxford Apartment

omg you rich bastard that’s so awesome

(via crownedinwood)

Joseph in black & white.

(Source: pantyfire, via elucipher)